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04 Сентябрь,2003 | According to HeartMath Study, Millions Gripped by NEDS - New Study Findings Link Heavy Internet Usage, Information Overload and Social Isolation t

BOULDER CREEK, Calif., Sept. 4 /PRNewswire/ -- Tim Sanders and HeartMath are releasing new findings of a national study that links depression and symptoms of depression with the always-on-economy. The project spokesperson and founder is Tim Sanders, Internet executive and author of the New York Times Bestseller LOVE IS THE KILLER APP. PR Newswire via NewsEdge Corporation : BOULDER CREEK, Calif., Sept. 4 /PRNewswire/ -- Tim Sanders and HeartMath(r) are releasing new findings of a national study that links depression and symptoms of depression with the always-on-economy. The project spokesperson and founder is Tim Sanders, Internet executive and author of the New York Times Bestseller LOVE IS THE KILLER APP. Tim worked at the core of the new economy during its birth and wrote a book about how to survive and thrive during this time of technical efficiency and inhumanity. "In a world of constant interruption and too much information, Love is the Killer App. In short, the solution is not to turn off your computer, but to build your resiliency through warm living," says Sanders. Tim believes technology is good for many things and says it's here to stay but warns that the isolation often created by technology can be devastating. Over the last two years, as he traveled the globe giving keynote speeches and presentations he heard an alarming number of stories from people who are struggling with what he has coined, NEDS -- New Economy Depression Syndrome. NEDS is a self-reinforcing depression brought on by information overload and frequent interruption leading to an erosion of close personal relationships. Symptoms of NEDS include anxiety, exhaustion, burn-out, difficulty making decisions, irritability, sadness, and sleep disturbances. Tim believed underlying many of these symptoms is information overload. For example information workers scan hundreds of pages of information daily while enduring a constant flow of interruptions from cell phones, blackberries, instant messaging and pagers. At the same time, many people lack quality interaction in relationships. Some of us even email the person in the cubicle next to us instead of walking five feet to ask a question. There are also countless others whose primary communications and contact occurs in cyberspace. This combination of information overload, constant interruption and social isolation can be emotionally and physically devastating. Tim realized work had to be more personal. Life in Cyberspace is missing the warmhearted connections that come from more intimate contact -- meeting with people in person, talking live on the phone. "As I traveled the world sharing my theory," he says, "I began to get inundated with emails from people saying that their lives were empty because they lived only in cyberspace -- a cold place. Research from around the world suggested the existence of internet addiction and technology related depression." Based on the Japanese research by Chiba University, combined with the domestic user research by Metafacts, Tim has estimated that over 8 million Americans qualify as NEDS victims. The health effects include heart disease, high blood pressure and reduced immune system performance. The impact on business includes lost productivity. A recent study by the Journal of the American Medical Association estimates that 44 billion dollars are lost each year in productivity because of work related depression -- NEDS could cause a large segment of that loss. This motivated Sanders to create this research project to confirm the relationship between technology use and depression. To validate his theory on NEDS and to help find solutions, Tim teamed with researchers at HeartMath to create and analyze a study aimed at uncovering the symptoms linked to NEDS and to confirm the NEDS hypothesis. The survey was completed in early August 2003. HeartMath is best known for their cutting-edge research and scientifically validated solutions to stress. (http://www.heartmath.com) For over a decade, their research has helped to define the role of the heart in connection to our emotional experiences and how this relationship affects our health, quality of life, cognitive function, and performance. Over 1,500 people participated in the survey testing the NEDS theory. The study, based on survey data from the general population was designed to test the significance of the relationship between PC and internet usage, information overload and depression. The results were controlled for recent stressful life events such as major changes in business and, or personal life. Following are some of the survey findings: * There is a significant relationship between symptoms of depression and the experience of information overload and the number of hours using the Internet. * The more the hours spent on the Internet, the higher the symptoms of depression. * Of those who reported more than 30 hours of weekly Internet usage, 45% feel exhausted often or most of the time and 37% reported having sleep related problems. * Of those who reported more than 30 hours in weekly Internet use, 17% feel less connected with friends and family than they did a year ago. * Those who experienced high levels of information overload also reported increased symptoms of depression. * Of those who reported feeling information overload three or more times per week, 41% feel tense and 43% have difficulty remembering things often or most of the time. * Of those who reported being interrupted by digital devices more than ten times per day, 41% feel exhausted often or most of the time. * Measuring symptoms of depression and information overload, 6.3% of the respondents are candidates for New Economy Depression Syndrome. * Candidates for NEDS were more likely to be male than female. 7.7% of the male participants in the survey were candidates for NEDS, versus 5.6% of the women. * Those who felt warmhearted, and easy-going more often, reported less depression symptoms. These findings were not surprising to HeartMath. HeartMath trains thousands of people each year in major corporations on how to increase workplace performance and reduce stress. HeartMath's work has been published in journals such as the American Journal of Cardiology, Stress Medicine, and Preventive Cardiology. Their POQA survey data of over 4,600 working professionals represents the current workforce and documents a growing trend in stress related issues and symptoms of depression. Of the 4,600 people surveyed by HeartMath as part of their pre-training process, 32% reported feeling exhausted and fatigued often or most of the time and 29% reported feeling anxious often or most of the time. Says Tim, "HeartMath has completed over a decade of research on the subject and has developed a powerful system for helping people deal with anxiety, stress, and feelings of overwhelm. Their training programs emphasis the intelligence of being warmhearted. HeartMath has relevant research that can provide scientifically validated solutions for NEDS. When I wrote my book, LOVE IS THE KILLER APP, I advocated my own personal system that included building powerful and warm relationships with knowledge sharing, networking, and acts of compassion. This system helped me and many others overcome the general level of unhappiness which I now know was NEDS. I needed the warm compassion of others to overcome this. HeartMath's research and solutions support my theory." Terry Real, a leading expert on the subject of depression, and founder of the Relational Recovery Institute, approached Sanders about his findings and offered to contribute valuable thinking based on his clinical experience and knowledge on depression. Real was the first person to discuss male depression in his New York Times best-selling book, I DON'T WANT TO TALK ABOUT IT. Terry Real has been involved in screening respondents to the recent NEDS survey to identify personal stories from people that have recovered or suffered damage to their job, family, health and/or mental well being as a result of NEDS. Terry reflects, "One of our respondents was a doctor with a clear case of NEDS. Her hospital changed to computer-based records. That sounded great on paper, but now instead of talking to a specialist whenever she had a question, she needed to sift through hundred of pages of written materials -- far more than she could possibly digest. She lost her relationships, her sense of creativity and slammed into information overload. The result was a clinical depression." These personal stories may be available as content for an extended show or segment on NEDS. As a therapist Real is particularly impressed with the role of relationships in the NEDS equation. According to Real, "Rich relationships buffer us from the stress of information overload. I am just beginning to look at the solutions, but the direction is clear: High Tech Plus Low Relationships = NEDS. We need to reverse that, encouraging tech-free zones in our workspace and nurturing human interaction." Real sees "Internet Addiction" as part of the larger NEDS picture. He observes, "Addiction is the most extreme form of the process affecting all of us. Technology is seductive, it's fast and easy -- a psychological junk food. The more we turn to it the less satisfied we feel. Then we go back to our emails and cell-phones for another "hit." As a society I think we need to learn how to unplug and hug. You will be more productive, and a lot happier, in the long run." Tim Sanders, Bruce Cryer, President and CEO of HeartMath and depression expert, Terrence Real will be available for national broadcast, print and radio segments and tapings. For More Information and to get advanced information on the complete survey, NEDS and/or any of the partners please contact: Heidi Krupp Krupp Kommunications 212/579-2010 HKrupp KruppKommunications.com or www.kruppkommunications.com or Gabriella Boehmer HeartMath 831-338-8710 gboehmer heartmath.com or go to www.gotneds.com . SOURCE HeartMath -0- 09/04/2003 /CONTACT: Heidi Krupp of Krupp Kommunications, +1-212-579-2010, HKrupp KruppKommunications.com, for HeartMath; or Gabriella Boehmer of HeartMath, +1-831-338-8710, gboehmer heartmath.com / /Web site: http://www.gotneds.com http://www.heartmath.com / CO: HeartMath ST: California IN: CPR HEA PUB BKS MLM SU: SVY KB -- NYTH143 -- 7659 09/04/2003 16:00 EDT http://www.prnewswire.com <> << Copyright ©2003 PR Newswire >>

28 Август,2003 | Illness could cause patients to forget their medication - Schizophrenia

Patients with schizophrenia must take medication regularly to reduce their risk of relapse. But the disease impairs memory, according to new research, meaning these patients may have difficulty in remembering to take their tablets. Medical Letter on the CDC & FDA via NewsEdge Corporation : Patients with schizophrenia must take medication regularly to reduce their risk of relapse. But the disease impairs memory, according to new research, meaning these patients may have difficulty in remembering to take their tablets. Habitual tasks, like taking medicine every few hours, rely on "prospective memory". This type of memory, which appears to be impaired by schizophrenia, enables you to remember that you have to do something in the future, without being prompted. Brita Elvevag, from the Clinical Brain Disorders Branch of the U.S. National Institute of Mental Health and her colleagues who carried out the research published in BMC Psychiatry, wrote, "To our knowledge this is the first study to show that schizophrenia is associated with an overall impairment in habitual prospective memory performance". The authors hypothesized that patients with schizophrenia would have problems with tasks requiring prospective memory. They might mistake remembering they have to do something with remembering they've actually done it. Their hypothesis stemmed from the theory that people with schizophrenia confuse real and imagined events. To test their hypothesis the researchers, based at NIMH and the University of Warwick, compared the prospective memory of people with and without the disease. In each test participants maneuvered a ball around an obstacle course for 90 seconds. They were asked to turn over a counter when they were at least 25 seconds into the test. The time delay ensured that prospective memory had to be used. Participants with schizophrenia were more likely to forget to turn over the counter. At the end of the test the participants were asked if they had remembered to turn over the counter. Approximately a third of the time participants with schizophrenia reported they had done so when they had not. Elvevag and colleagues wrote, "This would seem a worryingly high probability for such an apparently simple task that posed few problems for control participants. ... Our result suggests that patients' self-reports of having completed a habitual prospective memory task, for example taking medication, are likely to be particularly unreliable". Schizophrenia affects one in every hundred people at some point during their lives. While there is no cure, it is treatable with antipsychotic drugs. About 80% of those patients who stop taking their medications after an acute episode of schizophrenia will have a relapse within a year (Elvevag B, Maylor EA, Gilbert AL. Habitual prospective memory in schizophrenia. BMC Psychiatry, 2003;3:9). This article was prepared by Medical Letter on the CDC & FDA editors from staff and other reports. <> << Copyright ©2003 NewsRx.com >>

25 Август,2003 | Stanford, Packard Research Finds Better Drug Therapy for Children Predisposed to Bipolar Disorder

STANFORD, Calif.--(BUSINESS Children with psychiatric problems who also have a high risk of developing bipolar disorder respond well to a mood-stabilizing drug, according to a study that is the first to examine the drug's effect on children predisposed to bipolar disorder. Business Wire via NewsEdge Corporation : STANFORD, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Aug. 25, 2003--Children with psychiatric problems who also have a high risk of developing bipolar disorder respond well to a mood-stabilizing drug, according to a study that is the first to examine the drug's effect on children predisposed to bipolar disorder. The researchers at Stanford University School of Medicine and Lucile Packard Children's Hospital say determining the correct medication for these children is crucial because standard drug therapies, such as antidepressants and stimulants, may in fact trigger manic episodes, exacerbating their underlying condition. In a study published in the August issue of the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, the researchers found that more than three-quarters of these at-risk children showed improvement in their mood or behavioral disorders after receiving a drug called divalproex. The drug, used to treat mania in adults, essentially "cools off the brain," said Kiki Chang, MD, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the School of Medicine and a psychiatrist at Packard Children's Hospital. Bipolar disorder affects 2.2 million Americans, who experience extreme and debilitating highs and lows. Children known as "bipolar offspring" -- who have a parent with bipolar disorder but have not yet developed the disorder themselves -- and who suffer from other psychiatric problems are more likely to develop the disease. Researchers studied 23 bipolar offspring between the ages of 6 and 18 who had attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder or ADHD, depression or other mood disorders. These children showed signs of depression or mania but did not meet the criteria for bipolar I or II disorder, though they were considered at risk. Previous studies have estimated that bipolar offspring have up to a 24 percent chance of developing the disease, and ADHD might be a predictor. Researchers evaluated patients at the start of the trial, assessing them for manic and depressive symptoms and determining the severity of their conditions. After stopping any current medications, the children took divalproex for 12 weeks and underwent periodic re-evaluations. While there was no placebo control group, researchers monitored the participants for a relatively long time, said Chang, first author of the paper. Of the study participants, 78 percent were "very much improved" or "much improved" in their mood or behavioral disorders and 82 percent showed at least a 50 percent decrease in their ratings of depressive or manic symptoms. Children with depression responded dramatically to the medication after as little as one week of treatment. "What was most surprising was how quickly the patients responded, and that patients with depression responded so well to divalproex," Chang said. While traditional drugs are effective for most children, they can lead to an earlier onset of a manic episode for children at risk of bipolar disorder. The trick then becomes to determine which children are likely to be predisposed to the illness. Chang and his colleagues in the Stanford Pediatric Bipolar Disorders Program are conducting separate studies investigating the genetics and brain physiology of bipolar offspring to search for indicators. The scientists are also designing another divalproex experiment with a placebo component and will conduct a study monitoring these children to determine if, and when, they develop bipolar disease. They will also investigate non-drug interventions, such as family-focused therapies. "Our goal is to identify these children early for treatment and perhaps prevention," he said. "If we can prevent bipolar disease in childhood, we can prevent later treatment resistance and future complications like substance abuse, poor work and school performance, and even suicide." It is possible that divalproex not only relieves the mood and behavioral problems of bipolar offspring, but also delays or prevents the onset of the disorder, Chang noted. Studies of the drug in cell cultures and mice suggest that it can help protect the brain, but such studies have not been done in humans. For now, though, Chang hopes to alert psychiatrists to the possibility that children predisposed to bipolar disorder will respond poorly to standard medications for other mood and behavior disorders and that there are alternative treatment options. "We want to raise awareness about these kids and the idea that perhaps they will be better treated with mood stabilizers," he said. Families with at least one parent with bipolar disorder and a child with early indicators of the disorder or bipolar disorder itself and who are interested in participating in future studies can contact Meghan Howe at 650-736-2688 or meghowe stanford.edu. Volunteers will receive a full evaluation for all family members and may be eligible to participate in brain imaging, genetics or medication studies. Chang's co-authors are Kimberly Dienes, research assistant; Christine Blasey, PhD, research psychologist; Nancy Adleman, graduate student; Terence Ketter, MD, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences; and Hans Steiner, MD, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences. The research was supported by grants from Abbott Laboratories, which makes divalproex; the National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression; and the Klingenstein Third Generation Foundation. Stanford University Medical Center integrates research, medical education and patient care at its three institutions -- Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford Hospital & Clinics and Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford. For more information, please visit the Web site of the medical center's Office of Communication & Public Affairs at http://mednews.stanford.edu. Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford is a 248-bed hospital devoted entirely to the care of children and expectant mothers. Providing pediatric medical and surgical services associated with Stanford University Medical Center, Packard offers patients locally, regionally and nationally the full range of health-care programs and services - from preventive and routine care to the diagnosis and treatment of serious illness and injury. To learn more about Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, please visit our Web site at www.lpch.org. CONTACT: Stanford University Michelle Brandt, 650-723-0272 (Print Media) mbrandt stanford.edu Robert Dicks, 650-497-8364 (Broadcast Media) robert.dicks medcenter.stanford.edu KEYWORD: CALIFORNIA INDUSTRY KEYWORD: CONSUMER/HOUSEHOLD PHARMACEUTICAL MEDICAL EDUCATION SOURCE: Stanford University Today's News On The Net - Business Wire's full file on the Internet with Hyperlinks to your home page. URL: http://www.businesswire.com <> << Copyright ©2003 Business Wire >>

21 Август,2003 | Homer gene mutations not linked to schizophrenia - Schizophrenia

Mutations in the Homer gene family are not associated with schizophrenia. "Homer proteins are a group of proteins that regulate group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptor function. Drug Week via NewsEdge Corporation : Mutations in the Homer gene family are not associated with schizophrenia. "Homer proteins are a group of proteins that regulate group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptor function. As altered glutamate function has been implicated in many neuropsychiatric disorders, particularly schizophrenia, we have screened all three known Homer genes for sequence variation for use under the candidate gene association paradigm," researchers in Wales report. "We found seven SNPs, including three in exons," stated N. Norton and colleagues at the University of Wales. "Of these, none was non-synonymous. Allele frequencies of all the detected SNPs were estimated in DNA pools of 368 schizophrenics and 368 controls. Only one (Homer 1 IVS4 + 18A > G) was associated with schizophrenia in this sample, a finding confirmed by individual genotyping (p=0.01). However, in our extended sample of 680 cases and 671 controls, the evidence for association diminished (p=0.05)." The researchers concluded, "Our results suggest it is unlikely that sequence variants in the Homer genes contribute to the etiology of schizophrenia, but the variants we identified are plausible candidates for other neuropsychiatric phenotypes. Norton and associates published their study in the American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B - Neuropsychiatric Genetics (Mutation screening of the Homer gene family and association analysis in schizophrenia. Am J Med Genet Part B, 2003;120B(1):18-21). For additional information, contact M. J. Owen, Neuropsychiatric Genetics, 1F Tenovus, UHW, Heath Park, Cardiff CF14 4XN, UK. E-mail: Owenmj cf.ac.uk. Publisher contact information for the American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B - Neuropsychiatric Genetics is: Wiley-Liss, Division of John Wiley and Sons Inc., 605 Third Avenue, New York, NY 10158-0012, USA. The information in this article comes under the major subject areas of Schizophrenia, Psychiatric Disorder, Mutagenesis, and Proteomics. This article was prepared by Drug Week editors from staff and other reports. <> << Copyright ©2003 NewsRx.com >>

21 Август,2003 | Paraphrenia has hippocampal pyramidal cells, tangles, some amyloid plaque - Brain Disease Histology

Paraphrenia is characterized by preservation of hippocampal pyramidal cells, neurofibrillary tangles, and little amyloid plaque. Immunotherapy Weekly via NewsEdge Corporation : Paraphrenia is characterized by preservation of hippocampal pyramidal cells, neurofibrillary tangles, and little amyloid plaque. According to a study from the United States, "A recent article classifies paraphrenia within the tauopathy spectrum. More specifically, neurofibrillary changes appear restricted to the hippocampus and are accompanied by scant amyloid deposition. "The present study adds the preservation of hippocampal (CA1) pyramidal cell numbers to the neuropathological findings of paraphrenia," wrote M.F. Casanova and coauthors. The researchers concluded: "The lack of cell loss not only distinguishes paraphrenia from Alzheimer disease but offers, in addition, a marked similarity to a condition denoted in the medical literature as senile dementia with tangles." Casanova and colleagues published their study in Schizophrenia Research (Preservation of hippocampal pyramidal cells in paraphrenia. Schizophr Res, 2003;62(1-2):141-146). For more information, contact M.F. Casanova, Med College Georgia, Downtown VA Med Center 24, 26 Psychiatry Service, Room 3B-121, 1 Freedom Way, Augusta, GA 30910, USA. Publisher contact information for the journal Schizophrenia Research is: Elsevier Science BV, PO Box 211, 1000 AE Amsterdam, Netherlands. The information in this article comes under the major subject areas of Diagnostics, Histology, Proteomics and Neurology. This article was prepared by Immunotherapy Weekly editors from staff and other reports. <> << Copyright ©2003 NewsRx.com >>

19 Август,2003 | Любовь у помешанных - Чезаре Ломброзо

Любовь у помешанных - Чезаре Ломброзо

28 Июль,2003 | Клинический архив гениальности и одаренности - 1925 год выпуск 1

28 Июль,2003 | Клинический архив гениальности и одаренности - 1925 год выпуск 2

22 Июль,2003 | Психиатрические эскизы из истории, Том II - П. И. Ковалевский.

21 Июль,2003 | Daughters of older fathers at increased schizophrenia risk

LONDON Newswire reporters Children born when their fathers are 50 or older are at increased risk of developing schizophrenia, according to Danish and US researchers.And the risk may be slightly higher in girls than in boys, suggesting that a new mutation on the X chromosome might be the cause of some cases of schizophrenia. HMG - Health Newswire Professional via NewsEdge Corporation : LONDON By Health Newswire reporters Children born when their fathers are 50 or older are at increased risk of developing schizophrenia, according to Danish and US researchers.And the risk may be slightly higher in girls than in boys, suggesting that a new mutation on the X chromosome might be the cause of some cases of schizophrenia. Previous studies have suggested that advanced parental age could be a risk factor for schizophrenia. However, most of these studies did not control for other risk factors, such as death of a parent, family psychiatric history, or socio-economic factors. To address this, Dr Majella Byrne, of Aarhus University in Denmark, and colleagues conducted a case control study which compared 7,704 patients with schizophrenia with 192,590 time-, age-, and sex-matched controls, together with their siblings and parents. All participants were identified using a number of Danish national databases. Because every person born in Denmark is given a unique personal identification number at birth, which is used in all national registers, including health records, the researchers were able to access details on parents and siblings of schizophrenia patients, together with family psychiatric histories. As expected, the researchers found that increasing parental age was associated with an increased risk of schizophrenia in their children. However, after allowing for the fact that older mothers tend to be married to older fathers, only paternal age emerged as a significant risk factor. And after allowing for other known risk factors for schizophrenia, particularly a history of mental illness in either parent, the researchers found that men born when their father was aged 55 or more were at double the risk of developing schizophrenia. In women, however, the relationship was even stronger. The team found that women born to fathers aged 50 or over were more than twice as likely to develop schizophrenia. This increased to a nearly fourfold risk in those born to fathers aged 55 or more. Reference: Byrne et al, Archives of General Psychiatry 2003;60:673-678 HMG Worldwide 2003 http://www.health-news.co.uk/ Publication: HMG - Health Newswire Professional Distributed by Financial Times Information Limited <> << Copyright ©2003 Financial Times Limited, All Rights Reserved >>








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