04 Февраль, 2003
Myriad Genetics Discovers Major Depression Gene
- Discovery Triggers $1 Million Milestone Payment From Abbott - SALT LAKE CITY, Feb. 4 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Myriad Genetics, Inc. PR via NewsEdge Corporation : - Discovery Triggers $1 Million Milestone Payment From Abbott - SALT LAKE CITY, Feb. 4 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Myriad Genetics, Inc. (Nasdaq: MYGN), announced today the discovery of an important new gene named DEP1 that causes depression. The DEP1 gene will form the basis of a drug discovery and development program with Abbott Laboratories (NYSE: ABT), focusing on the development of an entirely new class of drugs to treat depression. The DEP1 gene discovery triggers a $1 million milestone payment to Myriad from Abbott. The DEP1 gene was discovered by genomic DNA analysis of over 400 Utah families with strong histories of major depression. Families were selected for multiple cases of major depression, which is a serious, chronic and often debilitating form of the disease, and early age at diagnosis of the disease. Three of the largest families contributing to the discovery of this gene each contained over 50 individuals with depression, all of whom participated in the study. The DEP1 gene acts in a novel pathway, not previously known to be involved in the cause of depression, and may lead to a novel class of anti-depressive therapeutics. The DEP1 pathway is independent of the pathway used by the dominant class of drugs currently used to treat depression, known as Selective Serotonin Re-uptake Inhibitors (SSRIs). "With the discovery of DEP1, Myriad and Abbott can initiate the drug development process from a strong starting point," said Peter Meldrum, President and CEO of Myriad Genetics, Inc. "We believe that the DEP1 gene and its associated pathway represent an exciting therapeutic opportunity." "We are truly delighted that Myriad has made such rapid progress on this dramatic scientific achievement," said Brian B. Spear, Ph.D., Director of Pharmacogenomics, Abbott Laboratories. "The identification of innovative new drugs for the treatment of depression is an important goal for Abbott's Neuroscience group. Abbott and Myriad scientists are working together to identify small molecule modulators of DEP1 using the state of the art drug discovery technologies available at both companies." The discovery of disease-causing genes provides an essential starting point for drug discovery, which is greatly expanded through the discovery of protein disease pathways. Using ProNet(r), Myriad's high-throughput protein interaction technology, the Company intends to identify critical protein interactions along the depression pathway. Proteins discovered in the depression pathway offer excellent opportunities as drug targets, while providing insight into the cause and possible treatment of the disease. The collaboration will focus on functional validation of these drug targets using biological analysis with innovative technologies for evaluating the importance of a particular protein in the cause of the disease. The combined use of Myriad's and Abbott's technologies provides a fast and effective means of drug target evaluation. Abbott's extensive experience in drug discovery and development should then enable rapid advancement of any product identified through the collaboration into clinical development. SSRIs include Prozac, Zoloft, and Paxil, and have rapidly become the first choice of many doctors for the treatment of depression. However, the drugs can take up to six weeks to provide relief and come with side effects. Accordingly, there is a substantial market for anti-depressant drugs and there are significant improvements possible versus current therapeutics. Myriad is pursuing a predictive medicine product from the DEP1 discovery, which could identify at-risk individuals who might then take preventive measures to avoid depression. Such a product may also prove useful in determining the class of anti-depressant used by physicians to treat diagnosed individuals as well as to differentiate the cause of depression on a medical genetic basis from the many diverse causes of the condition. Major depression affects about 12 percent of the population in the Western world at some point in life, making it one of the most common mental illnesses and the leading cause of disability worldwide. A very high proportion of sufferers remain undiagnosed and untreated. In Europe and the Unites States, sales figures indicate that as many as 100 million prescriptions are written per year, with sales growth of around 10 percent per year over the last five years. Much of this growth is due to the introduction of SSRIs, which are generally safer and better tolerated than older treatments. The SSRI class of drugs is now the most commonly prescribed type of anti-depressant with annual sales approaching $8 billion. Myriad Genetics, Inc. is a leading biopharmaceutical company focused on the development of novel healthcare products. The Company has established two wholly owned subsidiaries. Myriad Pharmaceuticals, Inc. develops and intends to market therapeutic products, and Myriad Genetic Laboratories, Inc. develops and markets proprietary predictive medicine and personalized medicine products. The Company has established strategic alliances with Abbott, Bayer, fDuPont, Eli Lilly, Hitachi, Novartis, Oracle, Pharmacia, Roche, Schering AG, Schering-Plough and Syngenta. Myriad's news and other information are available on the Company's Web site at www.myriad.com . The discussion in this news release includes forward-looking statements that are subject to certain risks and uncertainties, including statements relating to the role of the DEP1 gene in a novel pathway and its potential to lead to a novel class of anti-depressive therapeutics, the potential of the DEP1 gene and its associated pathway as an exciting therapeutic opportunity, Myriad's intent to identify critical protein interactions along the depression pathway, the focus of the collaboration between Myriad and Abbott, the ability of Abbott's experience to enable rapid advancement of products into clinical development, Myriad's pursuit of a predictive medicine product and the impact of such a product on at-risk individuals and medical diagnostics. Such statements are based on management's current expectations that are subject to risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those set forth or implied by forward-looking statements, including, but not limited to uncertainties as to the extent of future government regulation of Myriad Genetics' business, uncertainties as to whether Myriad Genetics and its collaborators will be successful in developing, and obtaining regulatory approval for, and commercial acceptance of, therapeutics; the risk that markets will not exist for therapeutic compounds that Myriad Genetics develops or if such markets exist, that Myriad Genetics will not be able to sell compounds, which it develops, at acceptable prices. These and other risks identified in the Company's filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including the Company's Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2002. All information in this press release is as of February 4, 2003, and Myriad undertakes no duty to update this information unless required by law. SOURCE Myriad Genetics, Inc. -0- 02/04/2003 /CONTACT: William A. Hockett, Vice President of Corporate Communications of Myriad Genetics, Inc., +1-801-584-3600, bhockett myriad.com/ /Web site: http://www.myriad.com / (MYGN ABT) CO: Myriad Genetics, Inc.; Abbott Laboratories; Myriad Pharmaceuticals, Inc.; ST: Utah IN: HEA BIO MTC SU: MW-SK -- LATU026 -- 4573 02/04/2003 06:15 EST http://www.prnewswire.com <> << Copyright ©2003 PR Newswire >>
03 Февраль, 2003
Research in Denmark shows higher risk of schizophrenia in immigrants
A study has shown that immigrants in Denmark have a greater risk of developing schizophrenia. NORDIC BUSINESS REPORT via NewsEdge Corporation : A study has shown that immigrants in Denmark have a greater risk of developing schizophrenia. People who have moved to Denmark from Australia, Africa, the Middle East and Greenland have the highest risk of suffering from the disorder, while those from Scandinavia have the lowest, reported Reuters. A research team at the University of Lund in Sweden identified that immigrants were more than twice as likely as native Danes to develop schizophrenia. There was also found to be a greater risk in Danes who had lived abroad and returned to Denmark. The reasons for the findings are not known, but the researchers have suggested that future studies of schizophrenia should look at immigration rather than particular ethnic groups. ((Comments on this story may be sent to nbr.feedback nordicbusinessreport.com)) <> << Copyright ©2003 M2 Communications Ltd >>
03 Февраль, 2003
Net trafficking a boon for drug addicts
02/02/2003 Addicts of a powerful anti-depressant are using the Internet to exchange information that allows them easier access to the drug, the Mainichi has learned. Mainichi Daily News via NewsEdge Corporation : 02/02/2003 Addicts of a powerful anti-depressant are using the Internet to exchange information that allows them easier access to the drug, the Mainichi has learned. Web sites inform addicts of Ritalin, a powerful psychostimulant with effects similar to speed, how to fake prescriptions for the drug and offer clues to the identities of chemists who "easily" prescribe it. Addiction to the drug used mostly to treat Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder is becoming rampant in Japan and authorities are being urged to crack down on its proliferation. Web sites dedicated to drug addicts began popping up as more people started using the Internet in the late '90s. Many sites were dedicated to Ritalin alone. Some Web pages list the initials of physicians who apparently prescribe the drug with few questions asked, as well as the name of the district where their clinic is located. Some sites offer information about how to trick a physician into diagnosing depression, while others provide information about methods to use the drug that will heighten its effects. Some contributors to sites, often calling themselves the "Ritalers,"outline details of their experience using the drug. Other sites have competitions to see who can consume the greatest quantity. The Internet is also proving to be a vital forum for Ritalin abusers, who use Web sites to arrange for drug swaps. "Many people use the Internet to get information about the types of drugs they want," a Tokyo woman addicted to Ritalin said. Growing numbers of forged prescriptions have also been reported. "With more color copying machines around, forgeries have been increasing for the past three years," a Tokyo Metropolitan Government health official said. In January last year, a boy used forgeries to secure from 10 drugstores massive amounts of Ritalin. He was sent to the family court for violating drug laws. As he had consumed 10 times the prescribed amount of the drug, he permanently damaged parts of his stomach and bowels. He was also plagued by hallucinations. Copyright 2003. All Rights Reserved. Financial Times Information Limited - Asia Africa Intelligence Wire <> << Copyright ©2003 Financial Times Limited, All Rights Reserved >>
31 Январь, 2003
Пополнение в разделе Неспециалистам

В разделе Для неспециалистов размещена брошюра "Психозы и их лечение"

29 Январь, 2003
Пополнение в разделе Пособия

В разделе пособия для врачей размещена лекция "Ларвированные депрессии" канд.мед.наук доц. кафедры психиатрии ЦОЛИУВ (ныне РМАПО) Видмановой Л.Н. В работе излагаются вопросы клиники, дифференциальной диагностики и терапии ларвированных депрессий

27 Январь, 2003
Пополнение в разделе Пособия

В разделе пособия для врачей размещена лекция "Аффективные психозы" Данное учебное пособие разработано сотрудниками кафедры психиатрии ЦОЛИУВ (ныне РМАПО) канд.мед.наук доц. Видмановой Л.Н. канд.мед.наук доц.Платоновой Т.П., канд.мед.наук асс. Суховским А.Л. канд.мед.наук асс.Жариковым М.Н.. В работе излагаются вопросы психопатологии, клиники, дифференциальной диагностики и терапии психических заболеваний, протекающих с аффективными расстройствами."

27 Январь, 2003
Mental Illness - More children are on prescription drugs for psychiatric disorders
The prevalence of psychotropic medication use among children and teenagers increased by two- to threefold from 1987 through 1996, according to a new study. Medical Letter on the CDC & FDA via NewsEdge Corporation : The prevalence of psychotropic medication use (drugs used to treat psychiatric disorders) among children and teenagers increased by two- to threefold from 1987 through 1996, according to a new study. Increased use of psychotropic medication (drugs normally used to treat psychiatric disorders, such as depression and other mood disorders, and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder) for treating behavioral and emotional problems in children and adolescents has received widespread attention in the past decade. However, the extent of psychotropic medication treatment for youths receiving care in community settings has not been reliably reported. Julie Magno Zito, PhD, of the University of Maryland, Baltimore and colleagues examined changes in the psychotropic medication use for youths from 1987 to 1996. They analyzed data from nearly 900,000 youths younger than 20 years old enrolled in two U.S. health care systems, one in a midwestern state and one in a midatlantic state. The researchers found that the total use of psychotropic medications by youths increased 2- to 3- fold and included most classes of medication. They noted a rapid growth since 1991 in the use of drugs known as alpha-agonists, neuroleptics, and "mood stabilizer" anticonvulsants. The findings were published in the January 2003 issue of the Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine. The use of psychotropic drugs by youths on Medicaid almost always exceeded the rates of youths enrolled in health maintenance organizations (HMOs) by large margins, particularly alpha-agonists, neuroleptics, "mood stabilizer" anticonvulsants and lithium. Youths in HMOs had rates similar to Medicaid-insured youths for antidepressants and drugs known as hypnotic agents. Antidepressant medications were the second most commonly prescribed psychotropic medication by 1996, after stimulants. By 1996, the 10- to 14-year-old age group replaced the 5- to 9-year-olds as the largest group using psychotropic medication in the Medicaid populations studied. In the HMO population, 15- to 19-year-olds were the most prominent age group using psychotropics. "The 1-year period prevalence of psychotropic medication use grew to 6% of youths younger than 20 years, which represents a 2- to 3-fold increase in the decade from 1987 through 1996. Most of the temporal change occurred between 1991 and 1996. Medication classes generally showed a proportionally greater prevalence with increasing age, but 10- to 14-year-olds emerged as the Medicaid age group most likely to receive psychotropic medications while the 15- to 19-year-old group predominated among HMO medicated youths," wrote the authors (Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med, 2003;157:17-25; archpediatrics.com) This study was supported by a grant from the U.S. National Institute of Mental Health, Services Research and Clinical Epidemiology Branch, Bethesda, Maryland, and the Harold and Leila Y. Mathers Foundation, New York. In an accompanying editorial, Michael S. Jellinek, MD, of Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, wrote, "The data reflect somewhat higher utilization rates for younger ages and possibly more serious disorders in Medicaid populations, which could support the hypothesis that mental illness in parents and the stressors of poverty add to the prevalence of child and adolescent psychiatric disorders in this subsample. An optimistic clinical perspective suggests that these data reflect a broader awareness of diagnostic criteria, less exclusive reliance on "talk therapy," and thoughtful efforts to extrapolate "off-label" from adult-based evidence to treat children and adolescents with serious mental health needs. "Given the scale of current psychotropic medication utilization, we have a responsibility to know what we are doing and the quality of our efforts. We need to ask ... this question: Are we prescribing the right psychotropic medications to the right children using the right treatment plan? Specifically, the work of Zito and colleagues reinforces our obligation to apply a quality assurance and research framework to our current pattern of utilization," Jellinek wrote. He concluded, "We need to have a more complete view in an ongoing, up-to-date time frame. We need a health plan-by-health plan quality assurance effort and a health services and basic research program" (Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med, 2003;157:14-16; archpediatrics.com). This article was prepared by Medical Letter on the CDC & FDA editors from staff and other reports. <> << Copyright ©2003 NewsRx.com >>
27 Январь, 2003
Acute Mania - New bipolar disorder indication sought for Seroquel
AstraZeneca has announced that it has submitted a Supplemental New Drug Application to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for Seroquel for the treatment of acute mania associated with bipolar disorder . Drug Week via NewsEdge Corporation : AstraZeneca has announced that it has submitted a Supplemental New Drug Application (sNDA) to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for Seroquel (quetiapine) for the treatment of acute mania associated with bipolar disorder (manic-depressive illness). The application to the FDA follows the completion of a comprehensive bipolar disorder clinical trial program undertaken by AstraZeneca to examine the efficacy and tolerability of Seroquel in this important disease area. The program has delivered strong and positive results in both the monotherapy and adjunctive therapy studies, which confirm Seroquel to be an ideal first line agent in the treatment of acute mania associated with bipolar disorder. "Seroquel is destined to be an important treatment option for clinicians treating bipolar disorder," commented Gary Sachs from Harvard Medical School, Boston, and lead investigator on the studies. "Treatment compliance in bipolar disorder is particularly critical since patients may lead full and productive lives when stable while a relapse in symptoms can cause real difficulties. The ability of Seroquel to improve the symptoms of the disease while keeping side effects to a minimum, may improve quality of life and ultimately lead to greater compliance with medication, offering real benefits to clinicians, patients and families." The trial program consisted of 4 double-blind, randomized trials, involving almost 1000 patients in 28 countries. The trials assessed the effectiveness and safety of Seroquel as both monotherapy and adjunctive therapy with mood stabilizer in the treatment of acute mania associated with bipolar disorder. Results from 1 of the adjunct trials were presented at the 3rd European Stanley Foundation Conference in Bipolar Disorder, in Germany. The results from this 3-week trial showed that Seroquel (average dose in responders of 580 mg/day), in combination with a standard mood stabilizing medication (lithium or divalproex), is significantly more effective than mood stabilizers alone in treating acute mania and is also well tolerated. Specifically, the results showed that patients treated with Seroquel benefited from: * A significantly greater improvement from baseline in their Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) total scores at day 21 compared with patients taking mood stabilizers alone (-13.76 and -9.93 respectively, p=0.021). * A significantly greater improvement from baseline in their Clinical Global Impression Bipolar (CGI-BP) Severity of Illness scores at endpoint compared to patients taking mood stabilizer alone (-1.38 and -0.78 respectively, p=0.001). * An incidence of EPS no different from placebo across the full dose range. The results from the remaining monotherapy studies will be presented at major psychiatry conferences in 2003. "We are very pleased with the results of the trial program and are extremely optimistic about the future for Seroquel. Seroquel is a truly unique compound and its profile is ideal for the treatment of bipolar disorder," commented Geoff Birkett, global vice president, CNS, Pain, and Infection. "Success in the market is driven by the impact on patients and our vision to introduce therapies that truly change patients' lives for the better. With its expanded indication range, Seroquel will continue to help patients and is the cornerstone of our rapidly growing CNS business." Seroquel is manufactured by AstraZeneca and is currently approved in over 75 markets. Seroquel combines broad-based efficacy in the treatment of positive, negative, cognitive, and affective symptoms of schizophrenia, while offering excellent tolerability. Seroquel is associated with an incidence of EPS and prolactin elevation no different to placebo across the full dosage range, a favorable weight profile, and no clinically important effects on QT interval. To date, over 4 million people have been treated with Seroquel worldwide. This article was prepared by Drug Week editors from staff and other reports. <> << Copyright ©2003 NewsRx.com >>
26 Январь, 2003
Anti-depression drug still in use despite warnings
The number of patients addicted to a drug treating depression has been increasing steadily despite the company warning the government that it should be banned. Mainichi Daily News via NewsEdge Corporation : 01/26/2003 The number of patients addicted to a drug treating depression has been increasing steadily despite the company warning the government that it should be banned. The drug, whose brand name is Ritalin, is dubbed by drug addicts as a "hospital upper" because it has similar effects to amphetamines and hallucinogenics. Ritalin has been on sale in more than 60 countries for treating oversleeping, but it is only used for light cases of depression in Japan. After experts voiced doubts about its effectiveness for mild states of depression, the Health Ministry began reviewing it in 1995. At that time, Novartis Pharma K.K., the company that markets Ritalin, told the ministry that the use of the drug on slightly depressed patients should be banned Officials of the company even added that at least one user committed suicide after taking the drug and becoming mentally unstable. "Users of the drug risk becoming addicted, and there are other effective drugs," one official of Novartis Pharma said. "So we thought that the drug had already finished its role as a treatment for slightly depressed patients." But the ministry only changed the description of suitable Ritalin users from "slight cases of depression" to "depression patients after other anti-depression drugs prove ineffective" in 1998. Now experts say that the government must take countermeasures as an increasing number of Ritalin users have become addicted or suffered mental and physical trouble. It is also alleged that some people pretend to be in a state of depression to receive Ritalin when seeing doctors because they believe they can get a kick by taking the drug. A 28-year-old woman said she had been diagnosed by mental doctors as being a depression patient and began taking three Ritalin pills a day. "Three pills a day soon lost their effect on me, so I visited several hospitals to receive the drug and took 20 pills a day," she said. "Then my heart beat sped up and I sometimes I used to hear strange noises, like I was hallucinating." She then visited the Akagi-kohgen Hospital, which exclusively looks after alcohol and drug abusers. Michio Takeyama, director of the Gunma Prefecture hospital, said that doctors should be aware of the risk of Ritalin users becoming addicted. "They have to be more careful about giving the drug to patients," Takeyama said. A 31-year-old man sought help at the Self-Support Service, a non-profit organization in Tokyo's Koto-ku that gives consultation to drug addicts, after he took a two-week prescription of Ritalin pills in just three days. "I couldn't help myself because I knew I could get high without being arrested," he said. An official of the Health, Labor and Welfare Ministry supervising the drug industry said that it still approves the use of Ritalin on depression patients because they have reports of its efficacy. Copyright 2003. All Rights Reserved. Financial Times Information Limited - Asia Africa Intelligence Wire http://www.novartis.com <> << Copyright ©2003 Financial Times Limited, All Rights Reserved >>
25 Январь, 2003
When hyperactivity in kids ceases to be normal
Tina Arceo-Dumlao 01/25/2003 WHEN celebrity Kris Aquino came out in the open and said that her son, Joshua, was suffering from Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder , many Filipinos realized that children they used to label as sobrang malikot were actually sick and in need of special medical treatment. Philippine Daily Inquirer via NewsEdge Corporation : Tina Arceo-Dumlao 01/25/2003 WHEN celebrity Kris Aquino came out in the open and said that her son, Joshua, was suffering from Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), many Filipinos realized that children they used to label as sobrang malikot (too fidgety) were actually sick and in need of special medical treatment. But even with a greater awareness of ADHD, studies show that less than one percent of Filipino children suffering from it are actually diagnosed of the ailment. Dr. Peter Joare, a member of the medical faculty of the University of Edinburgh and one of the leading authorities on ADHD, said global figures are just as bad, with only between 3 and 10 percent of children worldwide affected by ADHD getting diagnosed. One of the reasons behind the low diagnosis rate is the lack of awareness of the disease and the fact that many of the symptoms can be dismissed as simple bad behavior and are thus left untreated. More boys affected ADHD is a psychiatric disorder characterized by inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity that occur more frequently or severely compared to other children their age, thus affecting their performance in school or in social gatherings. It was first diagnosed 100 years ago by George Still, an Englishman, who described it as a "disorder of moral control." ADHD occurs more frequently in boys than in girls, with male to female ratios ranging from 4:1 to 9:1. It occurs across cultures as well as socioeconomic levels. Symptoms occur before the age of 7. Three types There are three main types: inattentive, hyperactive/impulsive and a combination of the two. Those considered primarily inattentive have difficulty following instructions, avoid or dislike tasks that require sustained mental effort, are easily distracted, do not appear to listen and have difficulty with organization. The hyperactive/impulsive types fidget with hands or feet or squirm in their chair, have difficulty engaging in activities quietly, act as if driven by a motor, talk excessively, have difficulty waiting or taking turns and interrupt or intrude upon others. The combined type shows symptoms of both types. In an interview with the Inquirer during his recent visit to Manila, Joare said some children suffering from ADHD outgrow these symptoms but as much as 50 to 60 percent of untreated children carry the disease up to adulthood. "If left untreated, most ADHD sufferers would grow up to be at greater risk to substance abuse and then to road accidents because they are either inattentive or hyperactive/impulsive. Their sense of danger is also impaired," Joare said. What causes ADHD? The cause of ADHD is still unknown but a majority of research works on the disease suggest that it is caused by neurological and genetic factors. Joare explained that children are normally born with some degree of inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity but as their brain develops, controls are put in place to inhibit these behaviors to promote learning and motivation. Joare said the chemicals that help the brain inhibit these behaviors are imbalanced in children and adults with ADHD. Drugs like Concerta of Johnson & Johnson help correct this chemical imbalance. Unlike other drugs, Concerta is taken only once a day and is effective for about 12 hours. Drugs, however, are not enough to cure ADHD. Joare said medicine should be combined with behavioral modification therapy to help a child overcome the debilitating effects of ADHD. Copyright 2003. All Rights Reserved. Financial Times Information Limited - Asia Africa Intelligence Wire <> << Copyright ©2003 Financial Times Limited, All Rights Reserved >>